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UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK

Warwick is consistently classed as one of the UK’s very best universities, and is a fast riser in the international rankings too. It has a strong reputation for teaching and research excellence, and offers you an intellectual challenge to satisfy your curiosity, and inspire you to reach your potential.

Our undergraduate degree courses cover a range of subjects from the fields of arts, science, engineering, medicine, and social sciences. And our campus, featuring an academic and student community representing more than 150 nations, is set up to give you everything you need to study, live and have fun.

WHY YOU SHOULD ATTEND A SUMMER SCHOOL AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK

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Browse the courses offered at the University of Warwick

Subject overview

The departments of Classics and Ancient History, Film & TV, and History of Art are combining to create an exciting and innovatory linked programme based upon the ancient world and its representation in art and modern media. You will learn about the ancient world, about ancient images, and the representation of the human body in the classical world; how modern technology and modern media such as film and TV are bringing the ancient world to life; and how classical themes run through and inform the history of art. We are seeking students who have an interest in any of these three disciplines. The proposed programme will form a coherent whole but will also give a flavour of what it will be like to study each of the individual disciplines. Above all, we would like to promote the innovatory and interdisciplinary approach of university scholarship, and how subjects can inform one another.

Course dates

29th July 2019 - 2nd August 2019

Number of places

20

Subject Specific Entry Requirements

There are no special subject requirements to take part in this stream at the Summer School. However, please note that there are requirements to study some of these subjects at degree level, e.g., English Literature or combined Language and Literature for admission to the Film and Literature course. To study History of Art, there are no formal A-level requirements, but we like to see subjects that show evidence of sustained writing, such as English or History.

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Subject overview

Computer Science is an incredibly diverse field which spans a broad range of topics, some of which are very mathematical in nature while others are very applied and look at how we can build new technologies. This enables people with many different backgrounds to come together to solve meaningful problems. At the University of Warwick, we teach Computer Science to many of the brightest students in the country who are passionate about wanting to learn how to apply their mathematical skills to such problems. During the Summer School, some of the lecturers you would have as a student here will explore key topics from our undergraduate curriculum with you, such as the foundations of Computer Science, algorithms, Cyber Security, and Data Science. Students will participate in a series of explanatory and practical sessions. No prior knowledge of Computer Science or programming is required.

Course dates

29th July 2019 - 2nd August 2019

Number of places

20

Subject Specific Entry Requirements

Mathematics at A-Level, Advanced Higher or equivalent

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Subject overview

Experience life as a Law student and Warwick’s Law in Context approach on our summer school. Throughout the week students will take part in a series of exciting seminars, workshops and discussions focusing on a number of national and international cases, led by our word class academics. The programme will give students an insight into the diverse range of topics a law degree covers, including criminal law, commercial law, contract law and human rights in practice, as well as key skills for studying Law at university, such as forming legal arguments and reading legal texts.

Course dates

29th July 2019 - 2nd August 2019

Number of places

20

Subject Specific Entry Requirements

None

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Subject overview

From Clinical disease diagnosis, Physiology and Neuroscience to Environmental Science and Ecology - we will aim to give you daily laboratories, short tutorials and lecture examples in the latest areas that Biology has to offer. Using clinical samples, molecular and microbiology techniques your challenge will be to diagnose, identify and treat a disease causing agent. Find out how to detect physiological parameters such as the heart ECGs, lung parameters and nerve conduction velocity. We'll even try some extreme pond-dipping using light and confocal microscopes and provide opportunities to visualise living organisms from the microscopic upwards.

Course dates

29th July 2019 - 2nd August 2019

Number of places

20

Subject Specific Entry Requirements

Biology at A-Level, Advanced Higher or equivalent

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Subject overview

How did the modern industrial world come to be? What is its future? And how should we navigate it? The academic disciplines of Philosophy, Politics and Economics help us to address important questions like these. Through a combination of lectures, interactive seminars and group-project work, participants in this stream learn what it is like to study these disciplines at University, how they differ from one another and how they intersect. Participants are given extended access to academic staff in the Department of Economics and the Department of Philosophy, including staff associated with the University of Warwick's prestigious Philosophy, Politics and Economics degree programme.

Course dates

29th July 2019 - 2nd August 2019

Number of places

20

Subject Specific Entry Requirements

Maths Level 7 / Grade A at GCSE or equivalent

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Subject overview

This stream will look at the theme of the ‘Colonial Hangover’ to pose a series of questions to you about everyday life that currently remain underrepresented in both public political discourse and the school curriculum. How do your lives intersect on a day-to-day basis with the legacies of the British Empire? Why, for instance, do the towns and cities in which we live look the way they do?  Are the sources of wealth through which the built environment was paid for linked to Britain’s historically imperial economy, or to the transatlantic slave trade?  How does the public art that you perhaps walk past every day without really noticing it raise to the status of ‘hero’ British imperialists whose actions would not stand the test of public morals today?  What might be done, say, when statues celebrate the lives of slave traders, when stately homes glorify prize possessions seized as part of the process of colonial expropriation, when town halls were constructed using the profits emerging from the plantation economy? Moreover, you will be encouraged to link these historical questions to the way in which you construct your own identity today.  What does greater recognition of the Colonial Hangover do for the positions you take on questions of both national and international politics?  Does it make you see other people any differently?  Does it make you see yourself any differently?  Will you be fundamentally the same person after you have gained new knowledge about the Colonial Hangover as you were when you began your week with us at Warwick?

Course dates

29th July 2019 - 2nd August 2019

Number of places

20

Subject Specific Entry Requirements

No specific requirements but it is anticipated that students will be studying subjects such as History, Politics, Sociology, Economics, English or other arts, humanities or social science subjects.

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CONTACT

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2018-12-17T12:36:26+00:00